Types of Welds

Workshop Grinding

06 Nov Types of Welds

Fillet Welds – A fillet weld joins two surfaces at an approximate right angle to each other. There are several types of fillet weld; a Full fillet weld where the size of the weld is the same thickness of the thinner object joining, a Staggered intermittent fillet weld refers to two lines of intermittent welding on a joint, and a Chain Intermittent fillet weld which refers to two lines on intermittent fillet welds in a lap joint or T where the welds are in one line.IMG_1582

Groove Welds – The second most popular type of weld, there are seven basic types of groove welds. The groove weld refers to beads that are deposited in a groove between two members to be joined. The type of weld used will determine the manner in which the seam, joint, or surface is prepared.

Seam Weld – A weld made by arc seam or resistance seam welding where the welding process is not specified. This term infers a resistance spot weld.

Surfacing Weld – These are welds composed of one or more strings or weave beads deposited on an unbroken surface to obtain desired properties or dimensions. This type of weld is used to build up surfaces or replace metal on worn surfaces. It is also used with square butt joints.

Plug Weld – Plug welds are circular welds made through one member of a lap or tee joint joining that member to the other. The weld may or may not be made through a hole in the first member; if a hole is used, the walls may or may not be parallel and the hole may be partially or completely filled with weld metal. Such welds are often used in place of rivets.

Slot Weld – This is a weld made in an elongated hole in one member of a lap or tee joint joining that member to the surface of the other member that is exposed through the hole. This hole may be open at one end or partially or completely filled with weld metal.

Flash Weld – A weld made by flash welding. Flash welding is referred to as a resistance welding process where fusion is produced over the entire abutting surface. Heat is created by the resistance to the current flow between two surfaces and by the application of pressure after heating is mostly complete. Flashing is accompanied by the expulsion of metal from the joint.

Spot Weld – A spot weld is a weld made by arc spot or resistance spot welding where the welding process is not specified. This term infers a resistance spot weld.

Upset Weld – An upset weld is a resistance welding process where fusion occurs progressively along a joint of over the entire abutting surface. The application of pressure before heating is required and occurs during the heating period. Heat comes from the resistance to the flow of electric current in the area of contact between the surfaces.

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