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Green Copper

13 Jul What Is Green Copper?

As a result of oxidation, the natural weather process that occurs when air and acidic moisture react with the copper surface. Since copper’s patina is a result of environmental exposure to carbonates, sulphates and sometimes chloride salts, the oxidation process can be quicker in areas with higher exposure to sea salts and pollutants, such as seaside or industrial areas.

Green CopperCopper’s characteristic greenish-blue patina is actually a protective surface coating that presents further corrosion (similar to aluminium corrosion). The visually appealing green patina can be recreated artificially on copper through a chemical process.

At 130 years old, Lady Liberty is still one of the most iconic and easily recognizable women in history. She represents hope, democracy and peace. Standing 151 feet tall atop a 154-foot pedestal, she gives new meaning to the term ‘statuesque’ and has a lovely green pallor.

But the Statue of Liberty wasn’t always green copper. When she was originally assembled in 1885, all 350 pieces were the typical brown colour native to copper. Over the course of the next 30 years the copper brown colour slowly changed, first to a darker brown, then to near black, and finally to the green copper colour we see today.

Copper surfaces can be maintained to avoid further oxidation by periodic oiling with a high-grade paraffin oil. The oil should be rubbed in with a clean, soft cotton cloth and repeated regularly to maintain the natural copper finish.

Copper and bronze have been used in architecture and sculpture for thousands of years. Durable and strong, copper is used today in both architectural and industrial metal fabrication applications. Sheet copper can be used as a lighter-weight alternative to slate or tile roofing materials, and can be shaped to cover domes, chimneys and other architectural features that require a watertight folded seam. Copper alloys used in architectural metal projects include bronze (an alloy of tin and copper), and brass (a copper/zinc alloy).

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Steel Framed Building | Dorset

29 Jun Why Cheapest Isn’t Always Best

Here atSteel Framed Building | Dorset, we pride ourselves on unbeatable prices with the highest quality and great customer care. We provide thorough research before supplying a quote to guarantee we provide quality materials and services at the best prices.

We all want the best value for money, but when it comes to metal fabrication, especially large-scale construction projects, the lowest bid doesn’t necessarily always provide the best value.

The lowest bid is often a result of a bidder’s mistake – scope items may have been missed, complexities may be underestimated or, worse case, craftsmanship may be undervalued. Any or all of these issues can lead estimators down a slippery slope.

Ultimately – and particularly when quality is at stake – the lowest bid almost always leads to other hidden costs that present themselves when it is too late to change.

Price quotes can vary for a multitude of reasons, and so can a company’s experience. When it comes to metal fabrication, and especially large-scale projects, you want the most qualified company for the job. A lesser-experienced company will often present a lower bid, and that inexperience is often reflected in lower-quality materials, shoddy workmanship, safety oversights and ultimately in the final project.

When it comes to choosing the one metal fabrication company that best suits your needs, there are five main factors to consider:

  • Capabilities
  • Experience
  • Quality
  • Methodology
  • Customer Service
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Welding in hollow section

15 Jun Welding Skills

Contact our fabrication experts today on 01202 882211 or email us at info@rowtecdorsetltd.co.uk to find out about the best steel fabrication Dorset has to offer.

Welding skills are classed as an art, it takes a lot of experience to get the right technique down. It is important to know what welders do and how they take steps to minimize weld distortion.

Welders cut, shape and join pieces of metal for both industrial and architectural projects. Key factors a welder should have are a skilful hand, a discerning eye, excellent Welding in hollow sectionmathematical skills, the ability to understand engineering drawings and, of course, knowledge about different types of metals and how to effectively operate different welding equipment and methodologies. High-end metal fabrication projects can be ruined by low-end welding skills, which is why, here at Rowtec, we take great pride in our work with our experienced welders.

Three of the most common welding fabrication processes used for metal fabrication are MIG, TIG and Stick Welding. The process used in a given project is determined by metal thickness, finish, location and application.

 

  • MIG welding is a great starting point for new welders and can be used with all types of metals and alloys. MIG welding is an arc welding process in which a continuous solid wire electrode is fed through the welding gun and into the weld pool, joining the two base materials together.

 

  • TIG is a more versatile welding process and requires a high level of skill. TIG welding can be sued to weld aluminium, copper, titanium etc; and even two dissimilar metals. This process is ideally suited to handling tricky welds such as S-Shapes, curves, corners or where the weld is going to be visible and where accuracy and finish is important.

 

  • As a manual welding process, Stick welding requires an even higher skill level. Stick welding, or shielded metal arc welding, has been around more than 100 years. Even though it’s an old welding process, it still plays an important role in manufacturing, with about 150 million to 200 million pounds of electrodes consumed in North America each year.
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Workshop Welding

18 May Welding In Dorset

Workshop WeldingHere at Rowtecour workshop is constantly busy with new materials coming in and finished products going out. We use both MIG and TIG welding within our workshop, MIG stands for ‘Metal Inert Gas’ and TIG means ‘Tungsten Inert Gas’.

Welding Definitions

MIG welding is an arc welding process in which a continuous solid wire electrode is fed through a welding gun and into the weld pool, joining the two base materials together. A shielding gas is also sent through the welding gun and protects the weld pool from contamination. The technical name for it is ‘Gas Metal Arc Welding’, or GMAW; the slang name for it is ‘Wire Welding’. We tend to use MIG welding for the majority of our projects here at Rowtec.

TIG welding, also known as ‘Gas Tungsten Arc Welding’ (GTAW), is an arc welding process that uses a non-consumable tungsten electrode to produce the weld. The weld area and electrode are protected from oxidation or other atmosphere contamination by an inert shielding gas, argon or helium, and a filler metal is normally used, though some welds, known as autogenous welds do not require it.

Our Philosophy

Here at Rowtec, we will not let a product go out the door unless we are 100% happy with the quality of it, so you can count on us providing our best work each and every time. We take great care and attention when it comes to the production of work. We triple check all measurements and materials to guarantee the best end product for our clients. All of our fabricators have gained years of experience in this industry and provide quality work on every project thrown their way.

Contact Us Today

If you are after a quote or want to know a bit more information, call us today on 01202 882211 or send us an email to info@rowtecdorsetltd.co.uk and we’ll be more than happy to help.

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