Gates Dorset

welder Industrial automotive part in factory

19 Dec Welding Positions

Welding is often done on structures in the position in which they are found. Techniques have been developed to allow welding in any position. Some welding processes have all-position capabilities, while others may be used in only one or two positions.

All welding can be classified according to the position of the workpiece or the position of the welded joint on the plates or sections being welded. There are four welding positions, which are illustrated below.Picture 1

Fillet Welding Positions – Fillet, groove and Surface welds may be made in all of the positions shown below.Picture 2

Flat Position Welding – In this position, the welding is performed from the upper side of the joint, and the face of the weld is approximately horizontal. Flat welding is the preferred term, but it is also referred to as a Down hand.

Horizontal Position Welding – The axis of a weld is a line through the length of the weld, perpendicular to the cross-section at its centre of gravity. Fillet Weld, Groove Weld, Horizontal Fixed Weld, and Horizontal Rolled Weld can all be done in this welding position.

Vertical Position Welding – In this position, the axis of the weld is approximately vertical. Vertical welding positions are shown in view C in the image above.

Overhead Position Welding – In this welding position, the welding is performed from the underside of a joint. Overhead position welds are illustrated in view D in the image above.

Pipe Welding Positions – Pipe welds are made under many different requirements and in different welding situations. The welding position is dictated by the job. In general, the position is fixed, but in some cases, it can be rolled for flat-position work.

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Workshop Grinding

06 Nov Types of Welds

Fillet Welds – A fillet weld joins two surfaces at an approximate right angle to each other. There are several types of fillet weld; a Full fillet weld where the size of the weld is the same thickness of the thinner object joining, a Staggered intermittent fillet weld refers to two lines of intermittent welding on a joint, and a Chain Intermittent fillet weld which refers to two lines on intermittent fillet welds in a lap joint or T where the welds are in one line.IMG_1582

Groove Welds – The second most popular type of weld, there are seven basic types of groove welds. The groove weld refers to beads that are deposited in a groove between two members to be joined. The type of weld used will determine the manner in which the seam, joint, or surface is prepared.

Seam Weld – A weld made by arc seam or resistance seam welding where the welding process is not specified. This term infers a resistance spot weld.

Surfacing Weld – These are welds composed of one or more strings or weave beads deposited on an unbroken surface to obtain desired properties or dimensions. This type of weld is used to build up surfaces or replace metal on worn surfaces. It is also used with square butt joints.

Plug Weld – Plug welds are circular welds made through one member of a lap or tee joint joining that member to the other. The weld may or may not be made through a hole in the first member; if a hole is used, the walls may or may not be parallel and the hole may be partially or completely filled with weld metal. Such welds are often used in place of rivets.

Slot Weld – This is a weld made in an elongated hole in one member of a lap or tee joint joining that member to the surface of the other member that is exposed through the hole. This hole may be open at one end or partially or completely filled with weld metal.

Flash Weld – A weld made by flash welding. Flash welding is referred to as a resistance welding process where fusion is produced over the entire abutting surface. Heat is created by the resistance to the current flow between two surfaces and by the application of pressure after heating is mostly complete. Flashing is accompanied by the expulsion of metal from the joint.

Spot Weld – A spot weld is a weld made by arc spot or resistance spot welding where the welding process is not specified. This term infers a resistance spot weld.

Upset Weld – An upset weld is a resistance welding process where fusion occurs progressively along a joint of over the entire abutting surface. The application of pressure before heating is required and occurs during the heating period. Heat comes from the resistance to the flow of electric current in the area of contact between the surfaces.

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30 Sep 5 Most Common Metals Used to Fabricate Railings & Handrails

From building and reinforcing, to internal, decorative safety features: metal, in one form or another, plays an important part in the construction and fitting out of commercial properties. Handrails and railings are a case in point. Where some years ago, spindles and banisters would have been manufactured almost exclusively from timber, today they are more likely to be fabricated from stainless steel, mild steel, galvanised steel, aluminium or brass. They can also be designed to include a mixture of these materials. So, what are the pros and gatescons of these five different metals?

  1. Stainless Steel

If you’re looking for strength with a modern, stylish finish, either internally or externally, stainless steel tube ticks all the boxes. Although more expensive than mild steel, long term maintenance costs are reduced due to its high corrosion resistance. Stainless steel can be manufactured into a wide range of designs and styles, and fitted to brickwork, blockwork, concrete, timber and other metals to produce the contemporary, modern style required.

  1. Mild Steel

Mild steel is the cheapest option when it comes to guard rails and hand rails. Material costs are low, and the ease with which it can be worked make the construction element very cost-effective, depending of course, on the complexity of the required design. Under heavy-use circumstances, many architects choose to stipulate carbon steel for its added strength and durability. Although mild steel rails, hand rails and guards are usually powder coated or spray painted prior to installation, they are prone to corrosion and need regular inspection and maintenance to keep them at their best, especially if it is exposed outdoors.

  1. Galvanised Steel

Inside or out, unprotected steels are at the mercy of moisture either internally from moisture laden air, or externally from the weather. While painting will help keep much of this moisture away, galvanising all interior and exterior steelwork, whether walkways, stairs or hand rails, will provide years of protection. Standard galvanised steel can be a silver colour through to grey. Although galvanised steel can be painted, it requires the use of etch primers prior to painting, pushing up the manufacturing cost of the finished product.

  1. Aluminium

The biggest pro of aluminium is its weight, or lack of. While this lack of weight makes aluminium easy to handle and use, it is also a much softer metal compared to others, and prone to dents and scratches. When being used for handrails and safety railings, greater bare

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Galv

22 Feb The Galvanizing Process

Hot dip galvanizing is the process of coating iron or steel with a layer of zinc by immersing the metal in a bath of molten zinc at a temperature of around 842°F (450 °C). During the process, a metallurgically bonded coating is formed which protects the steel from harsh environments, whether they be external or internal.

Galvanized steel is widely used in applications where corrosion resistance is needed without the cost of stainless steel and can be identified by the crystallised pattern on the surface (often called a ‘spangle’). Galvanizing is probably the most environmentally friendly process available to prevent corrosion.

hot-dip-galvansing-processThe galvanizing reaction will only occur on a chemically clean surface. In common with most zinc coating processes, the secret to achieving a good quality coating lies in the preparation of the surface. It is essential that this is free of grease, dirt and scale before galvanizing. These types of contamination are removed by a variety of processes and common practice is to degrease first using an alkaline or acidic solution into which the component is dipped. The article is then rinsed in cold water to avoid contaminating the rest of the process. The article is then dipped in hydrochloric acid at ambient temperature to remove rust or mill scale. Welding slag, paint and heavy grease will not be removed by these cleaning steps and should be removed by the fabricator before the work is sent to the galvanizers. After further rinsing, the components will then commonly undergo a fluxing procedure.

This is normally applied by dipping in a flux solution – usually about 30% zinc ammonium chloride at around 65-80°C. Alternatively, some galvanizing plants may operate using a flux blanket on top of the galvanizing bath. The fluxing operation removes the last traces of oxide from the surface and allows the molten zinc to wet the steel.

Post Treatment

Post galvanizing treatment can include quenching into water or air cooling. Conditions in the galvanizing plat such as temperature, humidity and air quality do not affect the quality of the galvanizing coating.

By contrast, these are critically important for good quality painting. No post treatment of galvanized articles is necessary and a paint or a powder coating may be applied for enhanced aesthetics or for additional protection where the environment is extremely aggressive. Chemical conversion coatings and other barrier systems may be applied to minimise the occurrence of wet storage stain.

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11 Jan Wrought Iron VS Cast Iron

People often assume that cast iron and wrought iron are interchangeable terms for early iron work, but there is  world of difference. Wrought IronIron Gates is iron that has been heated and then worked with tools. Cast Iron is iron that has been melted, poured into a mould, and allowed to solidify.

The fundamental distinction between cast iron and wrought iron is in how they are produced. The differences can be found in the names: wrought is a past participle of work (“worked iron”), and cast describes anything formed by the casting process. The different methods of production create metals with varying strengths and weaknesses, which is why you rarely see a cast iron fence or a wrought iron frying pan.

Wrought iron is composed primarily of elemental iron with small amounts (1-2 percent) of added slag (the by-product of iron ore smelting, consisting of a mixture of silicon, sulphur, phosphorous, and aluminium oxides). Wrought iron is made by repeatedly heating the material and working it with tools to deform it.

Wrought iron is highly malleable, allowing it to be heated, and re-heated, and worked into various shapes – wrought iron grows stronger the more it’s worked and is characterized by its fibrous appearance. Wrought iron contains less carbon than cast iron, making it softer and more ductile. It is also highly resistant to fatigue; if large amounts of pressure are applied, it will undergo a large amount of deformation before failing.

The term “wrought iron” is often misused today; it is commonly used to describe designs similar to historical wrought iron pieces – regardless of the metal used. Mild steel that has been machine-bent into shape in a cold state or cast steel and iron pieces that have been painted black both regularly mislabelled as wrought iron work. To be truly designated as wrought iron, however, a metal piece must be forged by a blacksmith who heats it and hammers it into shape.

Cast iron can refer to a range of iron alloys, but it Is most commonly associated with grey iron. Despite having the name iron, it isn’t pure elemental iron (Fe on the periodic table) – its actually an alloy containing 2-4% carbon, plus small amounts of silicon and manganese. Other impurities, such as sulphur and phosphorus, are also common.

Cast iron is formed by smelting iron ore, or melting pig iron (an intermediate product of iron ore extraction), and mixing it with scrap metals and other alloys. The liquid mixture is then poured into moulds and allowed to cool and solidify.

The final result is strong but brittle. Due to the higher carbon, cast iron solidifies as a heterogeneous alloy, meaning it contains multiple constituents, or materials in different phases, within its microstructure.

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28 Sep Structural Steel Fabrication and Construction

The construction sector has advanced and with it, many new and improved methods including the use of structural steel. Nearly everything in construction consists of structural steel with skyscrapers, large warehouses and shopping malls springing to mind. In fact, steel framed structures are commonly used across a wide range of construction projects including garages, residential housing and short-term temporary structures and for good reason.

Steel fabrication is used to create various components and products with different qualities for numerous applications. Structural steelwork has been the primary choice for most builders, engineers, contractors and structural steel fabricators. Many industries rely on steel products and fabrication services due its quality, reliability, flexibility, cost effectiveness and sustainability.

Steel Framed Building | Dorset

Durability and Versatility of Structural Steel

Structural steel ductile which means it has the ability to withstand stress for long periods of time and bend without breaking. Steel can be moulded into virtually any shape and needs little maintenance. It’s also reusable and easily recyclable without affecting its properties making it a great eco-friendly option. Standing tall against strong winds and extreme weather conditions make structural steel buildings a sure winner.

Structural steel frameworks are made with exact precision ensuring the highest standards and safer building practices. The durability of steel needs no introduction as these benefits clearly indicate:

o  Resistant to adverse weather and remains rust-free

o  Strong underwater and does not shrink

 Fire resistant through the application of intumescent retardants

 Can apply corrosion and weathering resistant material during steel framework fabrication instead of on-site

 Unaffected by termites and insects

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Steel Frame Fabrication Dorset

23 Aug Basics of Steel Fabrication

Fabrication is “the action or process of inventing or manufacturing something”, as explain in the oxford dictionary.

Steel Framed Building | Dorset

Steel fabrication is a sensitive task because it needs skilled individuals who can handle the process well and work with care. It covers designing, detailing, drawing and constructing many steel structural members like deck, handrails, stairs and a lot more. Steel is used for constructing bridges, residential building, etc. Structural steel is useful for building complex and simple structures in a cost effective and time saving manner. A systematic well-designed steel fabrication process offers many benefits.

 

A good steel structural fabricator follows a specific process and the metal has to pass through many operations. A basic overview of the fabrication process steps are explained below:

  • Firstly, structural sections may have to go through surface cleaning procedures so different cleaning methods need to be applied, such as, blast cleaning, flame cleaning, manual cleaning, etc.
  • Once the surface is prepared cutting to the length is important and it can be done by implementing the most suitable process like, shearing or cropping, flame cutting or burning, cold sawing, punching or drilling and arc plasma cutting.
  • After the above process, the steel may become distorted because of handling or transportation process. Thus, it needs to be bended, rolled or straightened.
  • Now fitting and reaming will come into the picture. Minor defects will be corrected here.
  • Now the use of fastening methods has to be proper as the strength of complete structure depends on it. The three fastening methods are riveting, bolting and welding. Now-a-days welding is the most common method, but sometimes the need of bolting and riveting may arise.
  • Then comes finishing. Finishing will be done by sawing, milling or any other suitable means. For satisfactory finished cuts, a saw machine is used and for smoothening the steel surface other methods are used accordingly.

Lastly, the surface treatment is done with metal or paint coatings.

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Steel Framed Building | Dorset

29 Jun Why Cheapest Isn’t Always Best

Here atSteel Framed Building | Dorset, we pride ourselves on unbeatable prices with the highest quality and great customer care. We provide thorough research before supplying a quote to guarantee we provide quality materials and services at the best prices.

We all want the best value for money, but when it comes to metal fabrication, especially large-scale construction projects, the lowest bid doesn’t necessarily always provide the best value.

The lowest bid is often a result of a bidder’s mistake – scope items may have been missed, complexities may be underestimated or, worse case, craftsmanship may be undervalued. Any or all of these issues can lead estimators down a slippery slope.

Ultimately – and particularly when quality is at stake – the lowest bid almost always leads to other hidden costs that present themselves when it is too late to change.

Price quotes can vary for a multitude of reasons, and so can a company’s experience. When it comes to metal fabrication, and especially large-scale projects, you want the most qualified company for the job. A lesser-experienced company will often present a lower bid, and that inexperience is often reflected in lower-quality materials, shoddy workmanship, safety oversights and ultimately in the final project.

When it comes to choosing the one metal fabrication company that best suits your needs, there are five main factors to consider:

  • Capabilities
  • Experience
  • Quality
  • Methodology
  • Customer Service
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Welding in hollow section

15 Jun Welding Skills

Contact our fabrication experts today on 01202 882211 or email us at info@rowtecdorsetltd.co.uk to find out about the best steel fabrication Dorset has to offer.

Welding skills are classed as an art, it takes a lot of experience to get the right technique down. It is important to know what welders do and how they take steps to minimize weld distortion.

Welders cut, shape and join pieces of metal for both industrial and architectural projects. Key factors a welder should have are a skilful hand, a discerning eye, excellent Welding in hollow sectionmathematical skills, the ability to understand engineering drawings and, of course, knowledge about different types of metals and how to effectively operate different welding equipment and methodologies. High-end metal fabrication projects can be ruined by low-end welding skills, which is why, here at Rowtec, we take great pride in our work with our experienced welders.

Three of the most common welding fabrication processes used for metal fabrication are MIG, TIG and Stick Welding. The process used in a given project is determined by metal thickness, finish, location and application.

 

  • MIG welding is a great starting point for new welders and can be used with all types of metals and alloys. MIG welding is an arc welding process in which a continuous solid wire electrode is fed through the welding gun and into the weld pool, joining the two base materials together.

 

  • TIG is a more versatile welding process and requires a high level of skill. TIG welding can be sued to weld aluminium, copper, titanium etc; and even two dissimilar metals. This process is ideally suited to handling tricky welds such as S-Shapes, curves, corners or where the weld is going to be visible and where accuracy and finish is important.

 

  • As a manual welding process, Stick welding requires an even higher skill level. Stick welding, or shielded metal arc welding, has been around more than 100 years. Even though it’s an old welding process, it still plays an important role in manufacturing, with about 150 million to 200 million pounds of electrodes consumed in North America each year.
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Workshop

04 Jun Sheet Steel Fabrication and Ironworks

It may seem that sheet steel fabrication and ironworks have similar jobs, both are classed as highly skilled trades, but both have different skill sets and utilize different tools and materials. Usually, ironwork is more structural and sheet metal fabrication is more functional.

WorkshopIRONWORKERS

An ironworks or iron works is a building site where iron Is smelted and where heavy iron and steel products are made. An integrated ironworks in the 19thcentury usually included one or more blast furnaces and a number of pudding furnaces or a foundry with or without other kinds of ironworks.

There are three main types of ironworkers:

  • Structural ironworkers erect the framework of bridges, buildings, stadiums, amusement park rides, bank vaults and other large scale industrial metal projects according to engineer blueprints.
  • Ornamental ironworkers, or finishers, are responsible for the more architectural metal elements such as window frames, stairways, catwalks, railings, fencing, gates and building entranceways. This ironwork requires a high skill in arc welding.
  • Reinforcing ironworkers, or rodbusters, is to strengthen structures. These are the workers who place a tie rebar, and reinforce concrete footings, slabs, bridge frame work and building structures.

 

SHEET METAL FABRICATIONS

These skilled tradesmen frequently work in metal fabrication shops or at manufacturing plants and specialise in fabrication, installation or maintenance, but may also perform tasks in all three areas. There is a long list of fabrications that can be produced by sheet metal workers, including roofs and rain gutters, heating and cooling systems, handrails, and more. When fabricating using sheet metal you have to take into consideration the thickness, tensile strength, manufacturing method and quality. There are as many types of sheet metal as there are types of metal, most commonly used ones are aluminium, steel, stainless steel, zinc, copper and a variety of alloys.

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